You need to wash properly. ‘Newspaper ads 1918 flu pandemic Show Some things never change

You need to wash properly. ‘Newspaper ads 1918 flu pandemic Show Some things never change

While governments and companies that are struggling all over the world look to the current 19-COVID pandemic, and scientists to see how different modeling approaches could effect the global virus trajectory, some observers make a comparison with other pandemic a century ago it happened above. The so-called Spanish flu of 1918, which are likely to have killed 50 million people around the world, represented as a reference point, showing how COVID-19 compares to other pandemics in history. Last week, a 105 year old man, thought Spain the last living survivor of the 1918 pandemic, “be careful” to make the world amid the onset corona warned. “I do not see the same thing repeated. It claimed many lives,” said José Peña Ameal Spanish daily El Mundo. During flu disease in 1918 and 19-COVID different, and many in the medical world has changed since then, newspaper ads from 1918 show that in some way the two moments are surprisingly similar. “We say that history in cycles, and that history repeats itself, and this is exactly the same in different aspects,” says Elisabeth Zetland, a researcher on MyHeritage that a 11.9 billion historical records searchable database including newspapers, mainly specialized in family history. (The cards are searchable here.) In early March, as the crown began to spread quickly, looking for Zetland “Spanish flu” in MyHeritage Historical Newspaper Collection. “What I were the similarities,” he says, “and I expect to be the stronger than it is now.” While medicine has advanced, and access to information has increased significantly since 1918, there are some parallels in the news and advice given to the public. Although the health care system in 1918 was more fragmented US on and disparate than it is now understood that authorities simply that people should know each other due to the highly contagious nature of the flu stay away. A vaccine shortage at that time meant that public health efforts have been focused on hygiene in the personal world, quarantines and limiting public gatherings. The emphasis on washing hands frequently, avoiding crowds and wearing masks had been rejected again and again in newspaper articles of the time for people to disobey the rules. An announcement for the Red Cross of Berkeley, Calif., Daily Gazette in October 1918 supported by the provincial authorities and the Board of Health, he said that the gauze masks was “99% proof against influenza,” and that everyone who is not wearing a mask was a “lazy dangerous.” in 2020, the recommendations differ in the US health expert at the Center for control and prevention of diseases advised healthy people who wear face masks, which are engaged in short supply now. But in other countries, especially in Asia, the use of masks is a cultural norm and slow down to a doctors help is recommended that the spread of the disease. Stay up to date on the growing threat to global health, by signing up for our daily newsletter crown. As is the case today, there was a shortage of masks in 1918 and after Zetland, most newspaper articles advising people how to make their own masks. Today, while it is generally accepted that homemade masks do not prevent the spread of the disease to do the road N95 respirators, many people are also versions DIY Sewing. commercial advertisers quickly cottoned to educate the marketing of their products to the public about the growing pandemic. hygienic conditions in the battlefields of World War camps in the last year of the war were terrible, and the war had drained much of the medical resources of the nation. The outbreak has been identified in the US in military personnel in the spring of 1918, and outbreaks within states were often attributable to military bases and military hospitals, as in Minneapolis. the living conditions in crowded urban centers in the United States in the 20th century created ideal conditions for the transmission of the virus. To educate the public about hygiene and market their product Lifebuoy soap bought a series of newspaper ads in the United States in November 1918. The ads are mistaken as to explain the announcement of public health, people exactly why brushing hands were important, and how their skin soap would “antiseptic clean.” leave today is the importance of hand washing is once again a choir. In some cases, companies, even if their products seemed to exploit public fears and relevant despair on the crisis. Some customers advertised their products as recommended by doctors or science, although products like Horlicks milk malt have little or nothing to do with medicine. A display of a massage parlor in San Jose, Calif., Almost promised that their treatments were “guaranteed Spanish flu heal.” “People remedies used then, it’s fun to read today,” says Zetland, who notes he kept repeating that a particular agent while he was researching. “They had to cook at 12 onions to get the juice and then drink a day, and that would be protected from the flu.” Today misinformation about the Crown and the best way to prevent infections – including, for example, that unmasked claims that the virus can kill her breasts with blasting hot air – they quickly spread on social media. Other products made an exhibition “without warranty of influence”, as an advertisement for a bicycle in Calgary Herald, with the promise that the motorcycle would come free of germs. The same newspaper published an ad for an insurance company a “special health policy” covers offer Spanish flu. More than 100 years later, some companies have used the same messaging. In early March promised more listings of Airbnb in the US “free crown” getaways for travelers to “escape” of the virus. Historians have attributed to the influence in 1918 with revolutionize public health systems around the world, but perhaps it does not seem that much has changed in the advertising world. On social media, journalists have received PR courts in recent weeks documented that seem to have a spin correlated crown, or be related to the news of the pandemic, even if the products themselves do not seem directly relevant to her health crisis. “Advertisers then, follow the movement,” says Zetland “as they do today.” Please send tips, leads and stories from the front to [email protected]
image copyright courtesy of MyHeritage.com