In honor of the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 75 years, we must give up our nuclear weapons

In honor of the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 75 years, we must give up our nuclear weapons

When the US military brought before an atomic bomb in the New Mexico desert in July 1945 explosion, the head of this program Physicist Robert Oppenheimer lines of Hindu scripture: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” A few weeks later, two atomic weapons destroyed the inhabitants of the worlds of the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and August 9, respectively. These attacks were announcing the end of Japanese colonial rule and the Second World War, and marks the beginning of the nuclear age. More than a hundred thousand people have lost their lives because of these bombs, caused by the impact, including the victims of poisoning by radiation and related diseases. But 75 years later, we still live in the shadow of that terrible mushroom clouds. Reckless policies in the United States and Russia face a new arms race in the world and a collapse of international agreements, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction begins to limit. In February of next year, the new treaty on strategic arms reduction (New START) expires – leaving the two nuclear powers of the world, without a binding agreement on arms control. Now we are closer to global catastrophe than at any time since 1945, according to the Doomsday Clock of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists in Washington DC In January I was about to move as the clock forward until midnight closer to 100 seconds Doomsday as we were in the height of the cold war. I was the first Secretary General of the United Nations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki to attend the anniversary of the attacks of a decade ago. I was deeply moved, especially when I hit the victims and obtaining their continued suffering over the generations know of time. I made up my mind that no atomic bomb to be used over and over again, and we do our best to make the world free of nuclear weapons. A decade we away from that goal as they have until now never. According to the latest international report by the Stockholm International Peace Research, are the reserve atomic bomb still 13,400 warheads. 2020 a pivotal year for global efforts were to make substantial progress in ridding the world of these weapons. Not only the 75th anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has high-profile opportunity to commemorate, but the treaty (NPT) Review Conference of the Non-Proliferation scheduled for April 2020, provided an opportunity for the nuclear powers best to commit to a real progress. Instead COVID-19 was deactivated or deleted global public meetings, and has put on hold the usual rhythms and practices put international diplomacy. The NPT Review Conference has been postponed until the beginning of 2021, and the United Nations General Assembly not to take in physical form this year. This disruption puts a load on the leaders of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council, including the United States, to show initiative and move forward. I urge particular President Putin Trump and New start to extend for another five years, until 2026. The United States has suggested that it wants to expand the new beginning and a new agreement to negotiate that China should include. While it is important for China’s discussion be engaged in global disarmament, is in bad faith fresh start to make the extension depends on Beijing, such as its holdings are the size of those of the United States and Russia one-twentieth. It ‘also realistic to think that eineine whole new R├╝stungskontrollabkomme could be negotiated and ratified in the next six months, with Chinese participation. The United States, however, we should accept the offer of President Putin and immediately to an extension. This would define a follow-up agreement to negotiate more ambitious, and may include efforts to China and other nuclear states be seriously investigated at this stage. More generally, I hope to see a recovery in the US by the spirit of multilateralism in the coming months that their leaders have shown when the United Nations in 1945, the political and economic construction and the other pillars of the post-war period as the former Secretary general of the United Nations, made me very sad for sustained and deliberate attack on the multilateral system in recent years to look. This has made it more difficult for managers and institutions to respond effectively and save lives, not only in relation to Covid-19, but also in view of the climate of emergency, conflict and economic inequality. I deeply regret that the United States were aware of the multilateral system weakened on several fronts over the past four years: from the nuclear non-proliferation and climate change to human rights, to respect free trade and health security. Such unilateral and isolationist approach weakens the security of the United States and around the world. We owe it to the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and those who survived to tell the story to focus all human ingenuity and know-how in the cause of peace and disarmament.
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