Rohingya refugees brace for a new coronavirus deadly threat

Rohingya refugees brace for a new coronavirus deadly threat

In the largest refugee settlement in the world, we hold our breath. On March 24, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh confirmed COVID-19 case. It has now been achieved only a matter of time before the blast near the camp where hundreds of thousands of refugees Rohinyga as I live. Some have already endured from our homes in Myanmar brutal military action and repression, we now provide the prospect of a further, prolonged devastation. A vaccine does not yet exist and a year or more may be available, which means that the 19-COVID scourge can circulate in the confines of the camp occupied for months. social distancing, self-isolation and quarantine are fantasies for Rohingya refugees like me. My family of seven living in a 5 meters (16 feet) Construction. These fragile stalls are the norm here in the fields, who have an average density of more than 100,000 people per mile. What makes things even worse is that we need help to survive. People here do not have access to income, and therefore can not afford the most basic materials needed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, such as masks and soap. In the camps, dozens of people, hand pump and toilet to share. Hygiene is a luxury. Bangladesh, the 56 cases of the virus and six deaths across the country have received a block at Cox Bazar imposed, even in the fields. The rumor and panic grows. One night last week, my field was alive with noise and fear. Prayers were sung at midnight as imams and people have looked for God’s protection. The crown has overwhelmed health systems well equipped rich Western and Asian countries. Bangladesh, one of the world’s poorest countries, has no chance of a better response to an outbreak among the 860,000 Rohingya refugees in Cox Bazar assembly. Local health experts say there are no fans in Cox’s Bazar and no ability to intensive medical care in the camps. While the government of Bangladesh said that the Rohingya are given access to medical facilities of government, if necessary, it is unclear what criteria are used to benefit from this access, or, as the transported patients or quarantined. If anyone ill with symptoms of the crown, it is unclear where you can also take the patient. There seems to be place that adopted in the fields examined. Stay up to date on the growing threat to global health, by signing up for our daily newsletter crown. Cox Bazar-based relief agencies are doing what they can to prevent an epidemic in the fields or delays. But many facilities and services have been temporarily closed. health clinics run organizations in the camps are short of equipment. It ‘clear that they are rapidly if the virus hits are overwhelmed. What makes it even worse is that the government has drawn up last year by cutting Internet and SIM cards in the fields. To protect them in the middle of this pandemic, we need access to news sites and health. We need to share information with friends and family through social media. But we are also deprived of this small lifeline. Human Rights Watch Bangladesh urging the revival of the Internet off “important information on symptoms and handicapped prevention, or risk the lives of refugees, in the end, the host community and health professionals.” The telecommunications restrictions mean that many Rohingya refugees can not even call the hotline, which was set up by the government. Our situation is already desperate. And that’s before the virus removals through the field. I will not forget the suffering that can not only expect, but all communities displaced or vulnerable in Venezuela, Sudan, Yemen and Syria. All of us are sitting ducks and totally dependent on foreign aid for survival. The international community can make a big difference in our lives by what they can to help us at least face this crisis with dignity. We need health care, hygiene, test kits and medicine. We need to lift Bangladesh telecommunications blackout. The Rohingya spirit is strong; we have so much to overcome. We will continue to fight for our rights in Myanmar and Bangladesh. But now we’re back in front of him a fight for survival. We ask you to listen to our plea for help around the world. Please send tips, leads and stories from the front to [email protected]
Picture copyright by Allison Joyce- Getty Images

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *