12 innovations that will change health care and medicine in 2020

12 innovations that will change health care and medicine in 2020

to pocket ultrasound equipment, 50 times less costs as compared with the machines in hospitals (and the phone connect). Virtual reality has accelerated rehabilitation healing. Artificial intelligence is better now turned into a medical expert to reap the lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations of the drug at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but there are at least glimpsed in the column below dozen inventions and concepts. While people, stand behind them at the forefront of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is quite likely to be representative of the new version of the public health and medical science in 2020. David Abney: Drone-delivered medical care by UPS in March has a test program called bull by the horns led by autonomous drones deliveries of a hospital in Raleigh, NC, only 150 meters away from critical medical specimens, including blood or the tissue between two branches from each other. A fleet-footed runner away almost as fast as possible to cover the drones, but as a proof-of-concept program succeeded in October, the FAA, the company issued the authorization to 20 hospitals across the United States to expand the next two years. “We expect UPS forward flight, one day be a very important part of our company,” said CEO David Abney UPS service, to provide urine samples, blood and tissues, and medical basics such as drugs and transfusable blood. UPS is not alone in pioneering air deliveries. Wing, a division of the parent company Google, alphabet, was similar, but more limited, the FAA approval to make deliveries for both Walgreens and FedEx. It operated in Ghana and Rwanda drones of Silicon Valley start-Zipline is to provide medical care in rural villages. -Jeffrey Kluger Christine Lemke: The biggest Big Data There are 7.5 billion people, and millions of us to pursue our health as with wearable smart watches, as well as with traditional devices, such as blood pressure monitors. If there was a way to aggregate all of the data and also make use of a few million of us, but all anonymous searchable, medical researchers would have a powerful tool for drug development, style studies of life and much more. company based in California Big Data Evidation has offers from 3 million volunteers just such a tool, the information developed billions of data points. Evidation partner with pharmaceutical companies such as Sanofi and Eli Lilly who analyze data; that the work already resulted in dozens of peer-reviewed studies on topics ranging from sleep and nutrition to cognitive models of health. For founder Christine Lemke, one of the projects being Evidation to see if new technology can effectively measure the chronic pain is personal: Lemke a rare genetic disorder caused frequent sore back. A cure of stem cells for diabetes Type 1 diabetes affects 1.25 million Americans, but especially the two has Harvard biologist Doug Melton attention: Evidation with Brigham and Women’s Hospital on project.-Jeffrey Kluger Partnership Doug Melton and his daughter Emma son Sam. The treatment can be a lifetime of careful diet, insulin injections and includes daily tests of sugar in the blood. Melton has a different approach: to create stem cells beta cells that produce insulin replacement. He started working more than 10 years ago, when the stem cell research controversy, and he hopes to increase. In 2014 he co-founded name Semma Therapeutics Sam and Emma-to is derived, to develop the technology, and this summer was acquired for $950 million Vertex Pharmaceuticals. The company has created a small implantable device that millions of beta cells holds pieces, glucose and insulin can be made, but keep the cells of the immune system. “If it works in humans, as is the case in animals, it is possible that people will not be diabetic,” says Melton. “They will eat and drink and play as those of us who are not.” – Don Steinberg Abasi Ene-Obong: A diverse group A Global Organic greater threat limiting the era of personalized medicine to hinder: People Caucasians are a minority the world’s population yet account for nearly 80% of patients in research on the human genome to create points blind in drug research. Dr. Abasi Ene-Obong, 34, founded 54gene change. Named for the 54 countries in Africa, the launch of Nigeria will make genetic material sourcing of volunteers across the continent, drug discovery and development more equitably. 54gene is aware of the ugly history of colonial exploitation in Africa. When companies to profitability will develop through marketable drugs on the DNA of people in Africa, based, Africa should benefit: so when 54gene with companies Partnership have priority in the marketing plans for drugs derived including African countries commit. “If we are a part of the road to the creation of drugs, then maybe we can get a way for some of these drugs in Africa” ​​Ene-Obong-says. Corinne Purtill Sean Parker: a disturbing approach to cancer research One the original disrupting the new economy is to bring its approach to medical research. The Parker Institute for cancer immunotherapy, founded by Napster co-founder and former Facebook president Sean Parker, is a network of colleges, including Memorial Sloan Kettering, Stanford, MD Anderson Cancer Center and much more. Its goal is to identify the traditional search for innovation and remove obstacles. For example, all institutions involved have decided to accept a decision of approval by the respective Institutional Review Boards, which “allowed us instead of taking years in weeks large clinical trials on the road,” said Parker, and reduce costs. Perhaps more importantly, Parker will let the project with its market sensitivity, “We follow the discoveries of our researchers come and then behind market put our money,” he says, whether the license to a product or go out on a business rotate. Since its inception in 2016, the Institute has launched 11 clinical trial projects and supported 2,000 scientific articles. Thomas Reardon: a bracelet that your mind reading A man can wear what is staring at a small digital dinosaur looks like a big black wrist watch to jump in front of him over obstacles on your computer screen. The man’s hands are motionless, but the control of the dinosaur with his brain. The device on your wrist is the CTRL kit that detects the electrical impulses that travel to the sliding motor neurons of the muscles of the arm and hand of the defender almost as fast as a person over a certain movement. “I want the machines to do what they want them to do, and I want that we will not be enslaved by machines,” says Thomas Reardon, CEO and co-founder of CTRL-Labs, manufacturers of equipment. The stooped posture, feeling of smartphones vintage keys represent “a step backward for humanity,” says Reardon, a neuroscientist who led a previous life, the development of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. The technology could retrieve new forms of rehabilitation and access for patients after a stroke or amputation, as well as those says.-Corinne with Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases, Reardon Purtill Jonathan Rothberg Open: L ‘ ultrasonography in the bag are more than 4 billion people around the world, the Imaging and no access to health care have, could a portable ultrasound device to benefit from iQ butterfly. Jonathan Rothberg, a geneticist at Yale and serial entrepreneur, has discovered how to put on a chip technology in ultrasound, so that instead of a $100,000 in a hospital, is a $2,000 take-anywhere gadget that connects to an iPhone App . E ‘went on sale last year for physicians. “Our goal is to sell 150 countries who can pay for it. And [the Gates Foundation] sells in 53 countries that can not,” says Rothenberg. The device is not as good as the big machines are not replaced in the richest parts of the world. But there might be scanning Make more routine. “There was a time, was used as the thermometer in a medical facility when a blood pressure cuff was used only in a medical center,” says Rothenberg. “Democratizing [health] is happening on different levels.” – Don Steinberg shravya Shetty: Cancer diagnosis AI do not display symptoms of lung cancer usually until its later stages, when it is difficult to treat. High-risk populations with early screening CT may reduce the risk of dying, but these are risks of its own. The National Institutes of Health in the United States found that 2.5% of patients treated with TAC later endure unnecessary invasive treatments – sometimes fatal, radiologists misdiagnosed false alarms. Shetty believes tin shravya artificial intelligence to be the solution. Shetty is a leader looking for a Google Health team that an artificial intelligence system built in the last two years, that exceed human radiologists to lung cancer diagnosis. After more than 45,000 trained patient CT scans Google algorithm detected 5% of the cancer cases and had 11% fewer false alarms than in a group of six human radiologist control. The first results are promising, but “it’s a pretty big gap between where things are and where they could be,” says Shetty. “It is not that the potential impact that keeps me going.” – Corinne Purtill Joanna Shields to read the paper AI science every year, published in the peer-review for 2 million research papers are to digest too much for each individual scientist. However, do not share equipment, this human limitation. BenevolentAI has created algorithms that scour the research, the results of clinical trials and other biomedical information sources on previously neglected research the relationships between genes, medications and diseases. BenevolentAI CEO Joanna Shields was an executive of companies like Google and Facebook, and then U.K. Minister of internet safety and security, in BenevolentAI accession. A frequent critic of failures to protect the tech sector in young people from abuse and exploitation online, Shields sees BenevolentAI as an opportunity to be able to use the technology for good. “We all have family members, friends, who are diagnosed with diseases that have no treatment,” he says. “If the technology revolution applied the scale and principles in drug discovery and development, we will see a change in the near future this conclusion.” -Corinne Purtill Sean Slovenski: Walmart ification of Health Care Whenever the largest retailer in the world aimed at a new market its giant footprint, the earth shakes. In September, he has opened its first Walmart Health Center, a medical mall where customers get primary care, eye exams, dental visits and root canals; The laboratory work, X-rays and EKGs; Consultation; Also fitness and nutrition classes. Prices are affordable without insurance ($30 for an annual physical, $45 for a consultation), and the potential is enormous. In any given week, the equivalent of middle America is going through a Walmart. “When I started here … thought [I], which may not be true,” said Sean Slovenski, a former Humana executive who came to bring the momentum of last year, Walmart health care. If the concept spread, the expected impact in any direction. They’re like the Walmart suppliers, physicians and other medical professionals who need to lower prices every day concerning traders. Yet, he warns Moody’s analyst Charles O’Shea – Don Steinberg Charles Taylor “Health how many times harder to sell food.” Much has too many people with suspected heart problems 3-D Digital Heart, invasive catheterization necessary blocks diagnose or clogged arteries. Physicians should therefore choose to improve the circulation of a handful of options, including a balloon angioplasty and stenting, the best method. Charles Taylor, a former professor at Stanford began Flow Heart to help patients avoid invasive diagnostic procedures and improve patient outcomes. business system creates 3D models to choose from, which can be rotated and zoomed, doctors different approaches to simulation screens. In some cases, it can completely avoid invasive procedures help. “With the addition of flow … Heart add to our resources available to determine the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, we are able to provide patients with better care, how to assess risk,” said Duke University cardiologist Manesh Patel, at the American College of Cardiology Annual Meeting in March. -Jeffrey Kluger Isabel Van de Keere: Rehab in virtual reality Isabel Van de Keere was taken one day in 2010, when a light-free steel from the ceiling at work and fell on her. The incident has left Van de Keere, a Belgian-born PhD in biomedical engineering, with a neck injury and severe dizziness, which took three years of intensive neurological rehabilitation. He practiced the same boring exercises dozens of times in a row, with the progress so slow that it does not seem detectable. Now 38, she is the founder and CEO of Immersive Rehab, a startup based in London whose goal is the neurological rehabilitation-experience the change with virtual reality. Enlargement of patients can experience the range and type of exercises VR creates more opportunities brain plasticity and repair pathways for use; increases the amount of data can be adapted for use measurement and caregiver advancement programs; and it improves the monotonous, frustrating rehabilitation experience. The feedback from volunteer patients and therapists was promising; The company is now preparing clinical trials in the US and Europe.-Corinne Purtill
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